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Thread: Codasrd

  1. #1
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    Question Codasrd

    I wonder what would happen if Decipher decided to release a OGL and/or a "CODA SRD" like Wizards did...

    would that be a good move for Decipher?

    Dec is too little a company to resist the would-upcoming wave of CODA games/settings (if ever they would, other companies preferring to publish a d20 game)?

    other reasons?

  2. #2

    Re: Codasrd

    Originally posted by gbnogkfs
    I wonder what would happen if Decipher decided to release a OGL and/or a "CODA SRD" like Wizards did...

    would that be a good move for Decipher?

    Dec is too little a company to resist the would-upcoming wave of CODA games/settings (if ever they would, other companies preferring to publish a d20 game)?

    other reasons?
    what does srd and ogl stand for?

  3. #3
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    Re: Re: Codasrd

    Originally posted by Space_Cadet
    what does srd and ogl stand for?
    Wizards of the Coast has published a free "Standard Reference Document" (available at the WotC site) where they describe all the mechanics that lie under the new Dungeons&Dragons game (without exemples, flavour text, pictures, campaign-specific things, etc...and other things as the exact way of character creation): that document is free to use by anyone to publish a new game setting and sell it. OGL stands for "Open Gaming Licence", and is the way a company can release any of its own work derived from the SRD and make it available to anyone other (at no cost) to use, just like the SRD itself. You are however allowed to add whatever you like to a previously released Open Game Content and sell the new work, with the sole obligation to publish a written copy of the licence.

    Then there is the "d20 Licence" that permits you to use the d20 Logo on your product and other stuff (e.g. claiming compatibility with D&D): you can use it, but must comply to some stricter rules.

    Basically they have made it all to make their d20 system become universal, and possibly for augmenting the sells of D&D, as a D&D manual is necessary to really understand the process of character creation and such...

  4. #4
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    Actually, it's "System Reference Document"...

    As far as I know, Decipher is not planning to create any kind of OGL program. I believe TPTB have been discussing the possibility of a generic CODA book, but nothing concrete has come of it.
    Former Decipher RPG Net Rep

    "Doug, at the keyboard, his fingers bleeding" (with thanks to Moriarti)

    In D&D3E, Abyssal is not the language of evil vacuum cleaners.

  5. #5
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    Generic Coda? Cool!

  6. #6
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    It's my opinion that the WoTC model worked as well as it did because of the enormous popularity to *previous* editions of the game.

    Back in the day, fans rolled their own campaigns, adventures, and supplements, and shared 'em (often for free). TSR tried to stop it, but Dancey and possibly others, convinced WoTC they could exploit it -- make all the money from the core books, and let other companies take the risks and maintain the R&D departments (which are generally not profit centers).

    The huge number of D&D fans has made it work for them, so far. As far as we know. I actually think the jury is still out on whether it will work in the long term -- one somewhat ominous sign is that D&D 3.5 came out ahead of schedule. That might mean revenue wasn't meeting Hasbro's goals.

    I think this model works because of that popularity. I'm not sure there's another game out there that would support such a model. You'd need a lot of fans -- and a significant number of them would have to proselytize for you, to bring in new fans. And you'd need reasonable assurance that other companies would become interested in making product for your line. I think that's very chancy. Probably more chancy than most companies want to be.

  7. #7
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    I think Fesarius caught the point, and I agree with everything he said.
    My question was just to try to face myself with the subject of rpg industry. Anyhow: is Dec selling their rpg well? From its website you would guess they pay attention to their public relations two or three times a year just to clean the dust off the server...

  8. #8
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    Thumbs up

    While not completely on topic, I would also like to express my interest in a generic Coda book. However, I hope, if it is ever made, that the book be truely generic in that every aspect of the system --save its roll 2D6 mechanic-- is completely generic and presents several different ways in which the rules may be applied. For example, alternate mechanics to profession/order mechanic such as a point-buy system. Or alternate health rules besides just wound levels. If Decipher's "toolkit" approach to rules options is any indicator, I think this is what may be in store, anyway. Speaking from a sort of business stand point, however, this would seem the likely way to go because such a product would draw some of the audience for the Star Trek and LotR games. Such a generic Coda book would not only be a stand alone product but also a great resource for those seeking basic rules options and expansions for their Star Trek or LotR (or both) games.

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by Doug Burke
    As far as I know, Decipher is not planning to create any kind of OGL program. I believe TPTB have been discussing the possibility of a generic CODA book, but nothing concrete has come of it.
    How can we send them our encouragement for this idea?

    I LOVE CODA!

    I have taken to this system in the same way I took to the Unisystem from Eden Studios.

  10. #10

    Suggestion

    Beach merchants have published the "Extreme Preservation Index" (available at the WotC site). I could try for http://www.entwicklers.org/ . Here they describe all the machines that lie beneath the new Dungeons & Dragons game the document is free to be used by anyone to publish a new game plan and sell it. OGL stands for "Open Source License".

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